The Voices at Arlington

The Voices at Arlington

(This story first appeared in The Dogington Post ) 

“…what most separates dogs from humankind isn’t mental capacity, however, but innocence. This innocence carries with it a clarity of perception that allows dogs to glory in the wonder of creation in even the most humble scene and quiet moment…the combination of their innocence and their intelligence allows them to serve as a bridge between what is transient and what is eternal, between the finite and the infinite.” –Dean Koontz

Gander, my service dog, and I frequent veteran cemeteries and memorials when we travel. We accept requests in advance from friends and social media; contacts will ask us to visit a relative’s gravesite, take a picture of a name on a memorial or leave something in memoriam. Gander quietly sits vigil as I prepare for the rites I have promised to perform. I take this ritual seriously and Gander honors the gravity of promise fulfillment with exceptional calm and professionalism.

Because of the solemnity of our intentions, we go when few people are likely to be there with us at the same time. But, more than once we have exchanged whispered greetings along the way with others and have occasionally been invited into emotional drawing rooms: that place between the living and the dead where Gold Star families mourn. Twice, while at Arlington National Cemetery, Gander has called people deep in grief out of their sadness and comforted them as they spoke about love and loss.

I think we often see and hear what we want to see and hear; we interpret simple events as important lessons. And at other times life rally does conjure up for us exactly what we need, at that moment in time, to navigate toward safety and comfort; a last chance at rescue before resigning ourselves to being adrift forever.

Gander had stopped unexpectedly several times. He would look to me for approval and then gaze out toward the long rows of white markers. Then he would cock his head the way a dog does when someone is talking to him.

A women and her daughter who had been ahead of us for most of our journey toward the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier stopped just a few yards short of our destination. “Do you suppose he can hear them? The soldiers?” I was relieved. It wasn’t just me who thought he was in touch with something invisible and inaudible to we humans. It was a beautiful sunny day. There was a slight breeze, but it was barely strong enough to rustle leaves. He looked engaged, not perplexed or curious in the same caring way he connects with me when I need a dispassionate listener in times of inner turmoil.

She told me that she visits Arlington once a week. Her brother was interred not far away. He’d served in Vietnam as a hospital corpsman. His Purple Heart was earned with a minor injury when their mobile surgery facility was mortared one dark midnight in 1969. He’d been given the Silver Star for his selfless actions that same night while attending to patients without regard for his own welfare. She shared that he had left both medals at the base of Vietnam Memorial years ago as a tribute to the dozens of men he had watched succumb to injuries beyond medicine’s ability to repair.

The day his tour ended he was taken by helicopter from a fire base where he had been performing triage, deciding who would stand the best chance of quick treatment, for wounded members of a platoon that experienced heavy casualties when ambushed by the Viet Cong. He was transported to a waiting 727 that flew him to San Francisco where, still in jungle fatigues, he disembarked through a gauntlet of angry protesters. At twenty years old he was a stranger in his own country after only nine months in Vietnam.

He’d been afraid when he went, she said. The fear was replaced by the grief and guilt he felt on his return. She told me that remembered every name, and held pictures in his mind of every wound he had dressed. His world became television, books, and a dozen ways to pass the sleepless hours.

A job in the post office on the graveyard shift kept him financially solvent. He never applied for Veterans benefit. Working at night, there were few people who demanded his attention. But, the anxiety and depression worsened. And isolation couldn’t create enough new memories to replace the old ones.

By the time he reached out for help, the VA, with the casualties of two new wars to attend to, had few programs and little time to coax cooperation from an aging Viet Vet. The new counselor hires were kind enough, but they couldn’t empathize with a man, decades their senior, who could barely give voice to the increasing sadness and despair inside of him.

He left a note the day he hung himself. He said the only reliable friend left in his life was suicide. He asked not to be buried in a military cemetery because that was reserved for soldiers who fought and for those he’d watched over as they died. But, because money was tight she had arranged for him to be interred at Arlington.

“I feel ashamed. I want him to be at peace,” she said quietly. “Do you think he can ever forgive me?”

You want to say “yes” at moments like that. You want to have a spiritual connection; you want to believe that this kind of deadly regret can be vanquished. That another good person should die physically, emotionally or spiritually because they had done the best they could, should never happen.

I want to lie just to give her some peace. But, remorse and grief are clever, intuitive adversaries: They know when you have nothing more to offer than a “sorry” in the way of a anecdote, aphorism or falsehood meant to send them on their way. I had courted suicide for a long time. There, but for the grace of Gander and God, was I. But, I couldn’t do it. I didn’t know what to do or say.

Just then, Gander rose, turned again toward the graves, before slowly moving toward me with his head bowed. He reared back on his hind legs and placed his front paws squarely in the center of my chest and looked me straight in the eyes the way he does when I am overwhelmed and at a loss for words or actions. A long kiss on the cheek later and he pushed himself off, wheeling to turn toward the woman, who by now was in tears. He turned his body sideways and leaned his weight against her.

It hardly matters whether or not it was coincidence that Gander chose that moment to be affectionate. It has happened so many times now I am no longer surprised when it happens. There was no explanation needed, no words left to be exchanged between us. She did lean down to look into Gander’s endlessly soulful eyes to say “thank you”. We both received an answer we could believe.

“That’s what heaven is. You get to make sense of your yesterdays” –Mitch Albom

Veteran Traveler blogger Lon Hodge is an award winning poet, writer and activist for suicide prevention among Veterans and victims of trauma. He travels with his service dog Gander in support of awareness of the healing power of dogs.

Follow Gander on Facebook at http://facebook.com/ganderservicedog on Twitter at http://twitter.com/veterantraveler or on Instagram at http://instagram.com/veterantraveler

You Can Purchase In Dogs We Trust here: In Dogs
100% of profits go toward suicide prevention charities.
This story first appeared in The Dogington Post and will be included in the In Dogs We Trust e-book and softcover editions.

The Great Frog-Dog Beard Off

 
Frog dog beard offAn Epic inter-service, inter-species battle to raise awareness about veteran suicide, service dogs and PTSD.

Gander, a 3 1/2 year old Labradoodle is a battle buddy for an Army veteran in Chicago. Gander, with an online community of over 300,000 friends distinguished himself as a real hero when he saved a young girl last year from a charging stray and now does triple duty as a therapy dog, service dog and PTSD/suicide awareness advocate. he visits VA hospitals, nursing homes and hospices around the country. Rescued from death row in Colorado, Gander was trained by a prison program and then paroled to Freedom Service Dogs in Denver and trained for service as a mobility and PTSD dog. Gander is listed as co-curator for, In Dogs We Trust, a collection of inspirational dog stories by NYT bestselling authors.

Seal Doggy Dog

Rob DuBois is a speaker, teacher, coach and consultant who was labeled a “smart power authority” while assisting U.S., British and Iraqi forces in Baghdad. He is a multilingual Navy SEAL with operational experience in more than thirty countries. Rob is author of the book, Powerful Peace.

Rob has presented his “Think like the Adversary” workshop to military units in the hottest combat zones, Fortune 500 corporate customers, and government agencies. He has served on the Deputy Secretary of Defense’s Senior Integration Group and directed operations for the DoD’s Red Team. Founder and CEO of SEAL of Peace Consulting, he lives with his family in the Washington, DC area and works anywhere on the planet.

The contest will run from March 1 to March 20th online. You can vote for the Navy Frog or the Army Dog at http://dogingtonpost.com/beardoff and add pictures of your own bearded companion, “bearding” photos or best human/dog pair shot. Prizes will be handed out daily and grand prize winners announced on March 20th in Denver at the Watering Bowl, a dog friendly pub. The loser of the contest will have all hair, except his trademark beard, shorn off.

The event will coincide with a book signing for In Dogs We Trust with five of the book’s author’s on hand and several invited celebrities. All proceeds from the event will benefit dog and veteran charities. Celebrity Emcee for the event will be Mark German of Leader of the Pack Radio 

Follow the events on Facebook at http://facebook.com/ganderservicedog or here

Follow Rob athttps://www.facebook.com/SEALofPeace

gander dog

 

Let the games begin!!

 

And remember to upload your pics and vote for your favorite beard at http://dogingtonpost.com/beardoff

 

Fake Service Dogs

The Real Trouble with Fake Service Dogs

The following guest post was written for The Dogington Post  

To fake it is to stand guard over emptiness.
–Arthur Herzog

There is a barely a day goes by that I do not see a tweet, news article or Facebook update about someone being denied entrance into a restaurant or shop because they are accompanied by a service dog. Many of the incidents have involved combat veterans and their PTSD Battle Buddies and other individuals with “invisible” disabilities.

Some businesses have suffered catastrophic losses and had their ignorance of disability regulations broadcast nationwide. Some of the public shaming has been wholly earned, while some businesses simply have never been educated and paid a heavy price for their on the job training. With the growing number of service dogs being employed and the explosion of new service dog agencies, the problem looks to get much worse before it gets better. So, why is it happening and what needs to be done?

A lack of standards for certifying a service dog, the growing number of online agencies that will sell anyone a vest and intimidating looking documents that imply the dog who carries them is legitimate, and a lack of proper training for service personnel, law enforcement and hospitality staffs are primarily to blame.

Libertyville, Illinois, the town adjacent to where I live, just passed an ordnance requiring Service Dog ID cards for “real service dogs.”  Therein lies the rub: There are no legitimate documents that can certify that any canine is authentic. While there are standards for trainers, there are no universally accepted standards for what constitutes an acceptable service dog. And the law itself, while sympathetic to local businesses who don’t want animals in their businesses for fear of losing customers, flies in the face of ADA requirements and standards.

The Veterans Administration, ironically exempt from Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) legislation is investigating requiring all dogs to be trained by Assistance Dogs International (ADI) certified trainers. That has caused uproar among established non-ADI trainers who opt out of ADI control over their methods. In the interim, the VA where I receive treatment is seeing a huge increase in the number of dogs and many of them inadequately trained and even dangerous.

A few weeks ago Gander, my service dog who was trained by an ADI certified trainer, was attacked by an aggressive dog who clearly had no business being in public: The dog barked, failed to heel, and attended little, if at all, to his human. They come in all shapes and sized: Earlier in the day I spoke to a veteran who openly, and almost proudly, admitted that he had bought his Chihuahua’s vest and laminated credentials online and that he proudly told people that his dog was a seizure alert companion. More recently, I watched a Great Dane with a service dog scarf wander from table to table in a local restaurant in search of scrap handouts while the owner laughed and encouraged horrified patrons to ignore him. Though service dog misrepresentation is a crime in many states, few businesses know enough about them to risk media humiliation by sending away a troublesome dog.

And agencies are not anxious to “certify” service dogs. It creates a measure of liability in out litigious society that suit happy plaintiffs and many lawyers would love to see. It could well imply the dog is somehow safe to be in public. While gander has never acted out, he is after all a dog and could possibly be goaded into a conflict an aggressive poser. And what if an innocent bystander was scratched or bitten in the process?

So, greeted with skepticism and questions, those of us with bona fide needs endure unnecessary hostility creates stress that is counterproductive and defeats the purpose for getting a PTSD service dog in the first place. I am worn out by franchises and chain stores rushing to the door to keep me from bringing in my “pet”. Starbucks, Subway and McDonald’s have led the way in abusive confrontations. But, I generally take a moment to explain and if there is still conflict I generally exit and write to corporate. I am saddened that confrontation has become routine for me.

“Fake is as old as the Eden Tree,” said Orson Welles. He is right.  I returned recently from eight years in China where nothing can be trusted to be as it appears. And the benefits for manufacturers to sell bogus products is not different than the motivation for a pet owner scamming their way into a hotel or onto an airplane with Fluffy or Spike to avoid the extra fees associated with bringing a furry companion.

So, what is there to do? One highly respected service dog group is circulating a petition to bring the Justice Department into the fray. They want the bogus registries shut down. But, I am not for that. Where there is an illegal will, there is a way and people will circumvent the law in an absence of true standards.

I propose a national conference on standards, training and registry that brings together hotels, restaurants, law enforcement, the ADA, trainers, service dog agencies and people like me with a vested interest in peaceful coexistence and accommodation. In the absence of agreement on what constitutes a service dog the problem will persist.

I envision a national hotline, a real registry site for dogs in training and who have passed a certification exam, national support for psychiatric patients who need training in social interactions with a dog, training seminars in conflict resolution for service staff, law enforcement and so on…

Education is the key…

 

Postscript:

Today, I was at a coffee shop and a woman asked me a question that sounded much more like an accusation: “What is wrong with you?” I took it in stride and replied with in my usual sardonic fashion. But, she represents a large percentage of Americans who have no idea why an able looking individual might need a dog. Imagine if her first encounter had been an aggressive fraud….

 

List of Service Dog Agencies

service dog agency listFollowing is an alphabetical list of service dog providers in the U.S. and a couple from Canada.

Please help us update the list by adding any organization you know, not here in the comment section below. Thank you!

This is a preliminary attempt to create a solid database of resources for people who hope to apply for service dogs. Soon we will have it searchable by State, Services Provided and so on.

Many agencies have sprung up in the last three to five years and I would like to add them in and would like to include more information on each of these groups.

If you know of a group we missed or have corrections for this list, please add a comment at the end of this post and we will index it ASAP.

Please include: Name, Address, Contact information, Type of Training (DIY, ect…) and client target population (Veterans, Hearing Impaired, Autism….).

Later I hope to include costs, waiting time, and other pertinent information. Thank you! to Maryann Helpern for researching and compiling this initial list.

Adler Assistance Dogs

Adlerdogs@aol.com

contact: Wendy Ender

Po Box 9728

Denver, Colorado 80209

Phone # 303-722-0327

 

AIM HI Service Dog Training center

(Animals in the military Helping Individuals)

North Plains District Vet. Command

Service Dog Center National Headquarters

833 McClellen Ave.

Fort Leavenworth,Kansas 66027

( military vets and their families only)

 

AIM HI Service DOg Training Center

CDR USA MEDDAC

Attn: MCVS ATA K

Pam Oughton, Director

Service Dog Training Center

Bldg.1489 Eisenhower Ave.

Fort Knox, Kentucky, 40121

phone# 502-624-8986

 

Alert Service Dogs

info @alertservicedogs.com

ASD,Inc.

9036 Buckeye Court

Indianapolis, Indiana, 46260

phone #- 800-518-1810

fax# 1-800-518-5144

 

Alpha K-9

Sacramento

info@alphak9.org

https://www.facebook.com/AlphaK9

7500 14th Ave.#21

Sacramento, California 95820

phone # 916-400-4337

 

Angel Service Dogs

PO Box 2756

Monument, Colorado,80132

 

Anything’s Pawzible

rendy@anythingispawzible.com

1330W North Ave,Chicago Illinois, 60622

phone#773-919-PAWS

 

Anything’s Pawzible

118 Madison ave

Cuyanoga Falls, Ohio

 

Arizona Goldens,LLC

AZGOLDENSLLC2COX.NET

PO Box 40776

Mesa,Arizona 40776

phone#480-205-6810

(emotional- autism service dogs)

 

Assistance Dogs of Hawaii

elena@interpac.net

PO Box 474

Hawi,Hawaii,96719

Phone# 808-889-0166

 

Barking Angels

www.barkingangelsservicedogfoundation

contact:Joe Giambione

7644 W.Dickens

Elmwood Park,Illinois 60707

Phone# 312-504-5225

 

Battle Buddies(USA)

www.battlebuddies.org

c/o Steven Frye

PO Box 922, Newport ,Rhode Island 02840

phone#

 

Battle Buddy Foundation

email

8859 Cincinnati_Dayton Rd. Suite 202

Olde West Chester, Ohio 45069

phone#

 

Blessings Unleashed Foundation

dana@blessingsunleashed.org

PO Box 1743

Glasgow, Kentucky 42142

phone # 270-670-4000

(autism service dogs)

 

Baltimore Service and assistance Dog Club

email-

6 St. Paul St. suite 902

Baltimore,MD 21202

 

 

 

Canadian Service Dog Foundation

www.servicedog.ca

address:

 

phone# 613-914-2733

 

 

Canines 4 Hope

Canines 4 Hope

Jason DeVito

Palm City, Florida

772-631-4931

 

Canine Angels Service Dogs
info@CanineAngelsServiceDogs.org
98 Shadow Moss Place
North Myrtle Beach, SC 29578
Phone | 917-575-6235
www.CanineAngelsServiceDogs.org

“We serve local veterans

in the coastal Carolinas and those

who can come here for training. ”

Canine Angels

info@canine-angels.org

Canine Angels

PO Box 526

Diamond Bar, CA 91765

Phone#1-888-541-846-6400

 

Canine Angels

info@canine-angels.org

Canine Angels

13475 N.Applegate Rd.

Grants Pass,OR 97527

phone#1-888-541-6400

 

Canine Battle Buddy

www.battle-buddy.org/

Canine Battle Buddy

8859 Cincinnati- Dayton Rd.Suite 202

Olde West Chester, Ohio 45069

phone#

 

Canine Companions for Independence

Debra Dougherty

North East Reg. training Facility

286 Middle Island Rd.

Medford,NY 11763

phone# 1-800-572-2275

&nbsp

Canine Assistants

A non-profit organization that trains and provides service dogs to enhance and improve the lives of children and adults who have physical disabilities, seizure conditions or other special needs.
3160 Francis Road
Milton, Georgia 30004
770-664-7178
Toll Free: 800-771-7221
Fax: 770-664-7820

Addtional info: The PBS special, and the book it was based on, “Through a Dog’s Eyes,” was based on this organization.

&nbsp

Canine Companions For Independence

Nicole Mouton, Exec.Director,NW

PO Box 446

Santa Rosa,CA 94502

phone#1-800-572-BARK

 

Canine Companions for Independence

8150 Clarcona Ocoee Rd.

Orlando,Fla.

phone# 407-522-3300

 

Canine Companions For Independence

SW Campus

PO Box 4568

Oceanside CA 92052

phone#-760-901-4300 or 1-800-572-BARK

 

Canine Canine Partners of the Rockies

info@caninepartnersofthe rockies.org

Canine Partners of the Rockies

c/o Linda Port

PO Box 460214

Denver, CO 80246

phone# 303-364-9040

 

Canine Partners For Life

www.K94life.org

canine Partners for Life

PO Box 170

Cochranville,PA 19330

phone- 610-869-4902

Fax- 610-869-9785

 

Canine Working Partners

canineworkingcompanions.org/cwc

Canine working Partners

PO Box 2128

Syracuse, NY 13220

phone#-

 

 

Central Pennsylvania Animal Alliance

info@cpaa.info

1802 Silver Pine Cir.

Mechanicsburg, Pa,17050

phone#-717-732-0611

Coalition for the Empowerment of Patriots, Inc.
Pets Empowering Patriots Program (A service dog therapy program for Veterans with PTSD, TBI, MST and/or physical disabilities)
http://www.empoweringpatriots.org
info@empoweringpatriots.org
P.O. Box 117
Griffith, IN 46319
219.798.1212

Canines for Veterans

info@caninesforservice.org

Canines For Service

PO box 12643

Wilmington, NC 28405

phone# 910-362-8181 or 1-866-910-3647

Coalition for the Empowerment of Patriots, Inc.
Pets Empowering Patriots Program (A service dog therapy program for Veterans with PTSD, TBI, MST and/or physical disabilities)
http://www.empoweringpatriots.org
info@empoweringpatriots.org
P.O. Box 117
Griffith, IN 46319
219.798.1212

Companions For Heroes

INFO@companionsforheroes.org

Companions For Heroes

PO Bx 7328

Fairfax Station, Va. 22039

phone#1-866-701-7553

Daffron Doghouse
http://daffrondoghouseownertrainingprogram.yolasite.com/.
DaffronDoghouse Owner Training Program
daffrondoghouseownertrainingprogram.yolasite.com
Ph# 913-523-6034

Discovery Dogs

DiscoveryDogs@DoscoveryDogs.org

Discovery Dogs

c/oSheri Denhower

PO Box 6050

San Rafael,CA.94903

phone# 415-479-9557

Fax-415-472-4431

 

Dogs Ears& Paws

info@eenp.org

Dogs Ears & Paws

c/o Maria Ikenberry

PO Box 3443

Chapel Hill,NC 27515

phone#919-408-PAWS(7292)

 

Dogs Ears & Paws

info@dogsandpaws.com

Dogs Ears & Paws

c/o Debbie Winkler

5399 Enterprise St.

Sykesville,MD 21784

phone# 410-655-2858 or 410-552-5052

Dogs for the Deaf

Phone: (541) 826-9220 or toll free outside of Oregon 1-800-990-3647

Mail: 10175 Wheeler Road, Central Point, Oregon 97502
E-mail: info@dogsforthedeaf.org
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DogsfortheDeaf

 

Canines for Service

PO Box 12643

Wilmington,NC 28405

phone# 1-866-9103647 or 910-362-8181

 

 

Dogs For Disabilities

info@dogsfordisabilities.com

Dogs for Disabilities

PO Box 537

Batavia,Ill. 60510

 

Dogs With A Mission

info@dogmission.com

Dogs With A Mission

c/o Jolanthe Wignholds

PO Box 40266

Washington,DC

phone# 202-669-8316

Fax 202-363-6595

 

 

Dogs Help

servicedogs@comcast.net

Dogs Help

c/o Myra Fourwinds

401 LaBore Rd #115

Little Canada, Minn. 55117

phone# 763-753-6260

 

Dublin Dog Foundation: Service Dog Charity

info@dublindog.com

Dublin Dog Foundation: Service Dog charity

1435 W. Morehead St.

Charlotte, NC

 

E.

 

Elite K-9 Academy

Jeanne or Nick Kutsukas

18291 126th Terr. N.

Jupiter, Fla.

phone# 561-575-3144

 

East Coast Asst.Dogs(Service Dogs)

ECAD1@aol.com

East Coast Assistance Dogs

Lu Picard

PO Box 831

Torrington, Connecticut 06790

phone# 860-489-6550

Fax- 860-489-3791

F.

 

Fidos for Freedom,Inc.

client services:clients@fidosforfreedom

Fidos for Freedom

1200 Sandy Springs,

Laurel,MD

phone# 410-880-4178 or 301-490-4005

Fax 301-490-0906

 

Freedom Service Dogs

info@freedomservicedogs.org

Freedom Service Dogs

2000 W.Union Ave.

Englewood,CO 80110-5567

phone-303-922-6231

Fax-303-922-6234

 

G.

 

Gold Str Dog Training

goldstar252@yahoo.com

Gold Star Training

c/o Eric Sanders

Parumph,Nevada, 89060

phone# 702-497-7229

 

Great Plains Assistance Dogs

gpad@daktel.com

Great Plains Assistance Dogs

c/o mike Goehring

PO Box 513

Jud, ND 58454

phone 701-685-2242

Fax- 701-685-2290

 

H.

 

Handi-Dogs(service dogs)

service@handi-dogs.org

Handi-Dogs

75 S.Montego Dr.

Tucson, Arizona 85710

phone-520-326-3142

fax- 520-319-8186

 

Happy Tails Service Dogs,Inc

c/o Joyce Weber

One West Sequoia Drive

Phoenix, Arizona 85027

phone# 623-580-0946

 

Hawaii Canines for Independence

Mauer@mauer.net

Hawaii Canines for Independence

c/o Mo Mauer

PO Box 790626

Pala, Hawaii 96779

phone#-808-250-5799

H4 – Hounds Helping Heroes Heal

(Creating a healthier future for U.S. Military Veterans who suffer from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and/or Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) by pairing them with an Emotional Support Animal (ESA) or PTSD Service Dog that has been rescued from a shelter.)

http://www.h4hero.com/

P.O. Box 153

Mansfield, TX. 76063

Email: info@H4hero.com

 

Hero Dogs- Service Dogs for america’s Heroes

hero@hero-dogs.org

Hero Dogs( service Dogs for America’s Heroes)

PO Box 64

Brookeville, MD 20833

Phone & Fax- 1-888-570-8653

 

I.

 

Independence Dogs

idi@netreach.net

Independence Dogs

c/o M.Jean King

146 State Line Rd.

Chadsford, PA 19317

Phone#610-358-2723

Fax-610-358-5314

 

k.

 

K-9 Service Dogs of New Jersey

K9chieftrainer@juno.com

K-9 Service Dogs of NJ

Oradell,NJ 07649

phone# 201-200-4368

Fax#-201-244-1117

 

Karosel Service Dogs

shirlee@bigsky.net

Karosel Service Dogs

c/o Shirlee Walker

4805 DesChamps Lane

Missoula, Montana 59808

phone# 406-543-7672

 

Keystone Human Services

mdehart@keystonehumanservices.org

Keystone Human Services

124 Pine Street

Harrisburg, PA 17101

phone# 717-232-7509

toll free- 1-800-377-6504

 

L.

 

Lonestar Assistance Dog Service(LADS)

LADS7612@charternet.net

Lonestar Assistance Dog Service

c/o Vivian Ausmus

PO Box 1528

Azle,Texas, 76098

phone#-817-249-8585

 

Loving Paws Assistance Dog

lvgpaws@lovingpaws.com

LOving Paws Assistance Dog

c/o Linda Jennings

PO Box 12005

SantaRosa,CA 94506

phone#707-586-0789

 

M.

 

Makana Aloha Foundation

Asst. Dogs of Hawaii

mo@assiatancedogsofhawaii.org

Makana Aloha Foundation

c/o Will & Mo Maurer

PO Box 1803

Makawao,Hawaii 96768

phone# 808-298-0167

 

Midwest Assistance Dogs,Inc.

c/o Mark Halasz

PO Box 1891

S.Bend Indiana,46634

phone# 574-272-7677

 

N.

 

Nanhall Training Center

c/o Frances Shatner Keys

2206 Martin Luther King Dr.

Greensboro, NC 27406

phone# 919-272-6584

 

New Horizons Service Dogs/the Lost Tree Charitable Fund

info@losttreefoundation.org

New Horizons Service Dogs

11520 Lost Tree Way

North Pam Beach, Fla. 33408

phone# 561-622-3780

Fax# 561-626-5885

 

New Life Mobility Assistance Dogs

newlife@NLMAD.org

NLMAD

PO Box 659

Moravian Falls, NC 28654

phone# 336-838-2215

 

Next Step Service Dogs

support@nextstepservicedogs.org

Next Step West Coast Chapter

PO Box 130487

Carlsbad,CA 92011

phone#768-438-9190 or 858-945-2455

Sally Montrucchio- training Dir. – West Coast leader

 

Next Step service Dogs

NJ Branch

no info

would call the west coast branch for info

 

North Star Foundation

www.northstardogs.com

northstarfoundation@charter.net

North Star Foundation

attn: Patty Dobbs Gross, Exec. Director

20 Deerfield Lane

Storrs, Connecticut,

phone31-860-423-0664

 

 

Northwest Battle Buddies

northwestbattlebuddies@gmail.com

Northwest Battle Buddies

PO Box 2511

Battle Ground, Washington,98604

phone#360-601-9744

 

P.

 

4 Paws for Ability

info@4pawsforability

4 pawsforability

253 Dayton Ave

Xenia,Ohio 45385

phone# 937-374-0385 or 937-708-6677

 

Paws Abilities

c/o Glen Martin

3735 Big Flat Rd.

Missoula,montana 59804

phone# 406-549-0221

 

Paws & Stripes

www.pawsandstripes.org

veterandogs@pawsandstripes.org

 

Paws for Freedom

lashearer1@yahoo.com

10580 Barkley St. suite 455

Overland Park,Kansas,66212

phone# 913-901-9400

 

Paws for Purple Hearts

sandra@pawsforpurplehearts.org

Paws for Purple Hearts

PO Box 50275

Arlington, VA 22205

phone#202-681-9575 or 707-238-5110

 

Paws for Purple Hearts

bonnie@pawsforpurplehearts.org

5860 Labeth Avenue suite A

Rohnert Park,CA 94928

phone# 202-681-9575 or 707-238-5110

 

Penny’s from Heaven Foundation,Inc.

www.pennysfromheavenfoundation.org

Penny’s from Heaven Foundation, Inc.

13423 Blanco Rd. Suite 218

San Antonio, Texas, 78216

phone#

 

Pets for Vets-Houston

contactforpetsforvetshouston.com

Pets For Vets

Jessica Devitt- Pres.

7941 Katy Freeway #175

Houston, Texas 77024

phone#713-364-6235

 

Pets for Vets-Chicago_Ill.

contact@chicagononprofit.org

Pets for Vets Chicago

345W. Canal St #C0001

Chicago,Illinois 60606

phone#312-583-7610

 

Pets for Vets-Wilmington,NC

pets-for-vets.com/

409 Black Diamond Drive

Wilmington,NC 28411

phone# I would call the Houston or Chicago #’s

as it looks like there are many divisios_ but not always full info. ( check for one near you)

 

Paws with a Cause

paws@alliance.net

Paws with a cause corp. office

1235 100th St S.E.

Bryon Center, Michigan 49315

phone# 616-696-0688 or 1-800-253-PAWS

 

Pro_Train

protrain@flash.net

Pro-Train

c/o Mark Castillo

1544 Avohill Dr.

Vista,CA 92084

phone# 877-223-3647

 

Puppies Behind Bars ( service dogs for vets)

puppiesbehindbars.com

Puppies Behind Bars

126 W 38th St. 4th floor

New York, NY 10018

phone# 212-680-9562 or 212-689-9330

 

Puppy Jake Foundation

Beckysbeach@aol.com

Puppy Jake Foundation

c/o Becky Beach

4020 John Lynde Rd.

Des Moines, Iowa 50312

phone# 515-490-9766

 

S.

 

Sam Simon Charitable Foundation

info@samsimonfoundation.org

Sam Simon Charitable Foundation

c/o Jannelle Hackman

30765 Pacific Coast Highway #113

Malibu, CA 90265

phone#-310-457-5898

(hearing dogs)

 

Semper Fido

Info@semperfido.org

Semper Fido

131 KenilworthRd

Marlton, NJ 08053

phone# 1-856-810-3923

 

Service Dog Express

Laurie@servicedogexpress.com

www.servicedogexpress.com

FB:Sevice Dog Express

Service Dogs Express

207 Willow Grove Drive

San Antonio,Texas 7824

phone#210-201-3641

 

Service Dogs For America

info@servicedogsforamerica.org

ServiceDogs For america

920 Short Street

Jud, NOrth Dakota 58454

 

Service Dogs of America

jackrayl@megiscounty.net

Service Dogs of America

c/o Pres. Jack Rayl

PO Box 228

Nitoa, Tennessee 37826

 

Service Dogs of Virginia

info@servicedogsva.org

Service Dogs of America

PO Box 408

Charlottesville, Va. 22902

phone# 434-295-9503

 

Service Dog Project

info@SERVICEDOGPROJECT.ORG

Service Dog Project

37 Boxford rd.

Ipswich, Maine 01938

Phone# 978-356-0666

 

Service Dog Training Programs

workinglikedogs.com

Working Like Dogs

PO Box 4578

Santa Fe, New Mexico 87502

phone# 1-866-445-3647

 

Service Dogs-Tackett Services

Tom@tackettservicedogs.com

Service Dogs-Tackett Services

PO Box 2461

Orange,CA 92859

phone#714-608-1077

 

Service Pets for Service Vets

RSMF.org/service

Pets for Service Vets

12 Port Access Rd.

Erie, PA 16507

phone#

 

Shore Service Dogs

info@shoreservicedogs.com

PO Box 2251

Salisbury, MD 21802

phone- cost too high for provider

please e-mail for info

 

Soldiers Best Friend_ Arizona

contact@asoldiersbestfriend.org

Soldiers Best Friend

5955 W.Peoria Ave.#6242

Glendale, Arizona,85312

phone#-480-269-1738

Fax-623-234-4815

 

St.Francis Service Dogs

info@stfrancisdogs.org

S. Francis service Dogs

PO Box 19538

Roanoke,VA 24019

phone# 540-342-3647(DOGS)

fax 540-342-0906

 

Sterling Service Dogs

info@sterlingservicedogs.org

Sterling Service Dogs

3715 E.Fifteen Mile rd.

Sterling Heights, michigan 48310

Phone#586-977-9716

Fax-

586-977-0079

 

Susquehanna Service Dogs

SSD@keystonehumanservices.org

Susquehanna service Dogs

555 LeSentier Lane

Harrisburg, PA 17112

phone#/fax-717-599-5920

 

 

T.

 

Tender Loving Canines-Service Dogs(TLCAD)

info@tlcad.org

TLCAD

PO Box 1244

Solana Beach,CA 92075

phone#1-800-385-1282

858-461-6827

Fax 858-461-6846

 

The Spirit Training Center- Home Of TLCAD

(all ifo above the same except address)

1250 Activity Drive Suite A

Vista, CA 92081

 

The Carlson Company(Service Dogs)

ccarlson@carlson.com

The Carlson Company

2305 Daniels st.

Madison Wisconsin,53718

phone#608-222-4540 ext.123

 

The Good Dog Foundation

info@thegooddogfoundation.org

The Good Dog Foundation

PO Box 1484

NY,NY 10276

phone# 888-859-9992

Fax-888-861-7312

 

U.

 

USA Battle Buddies

only info found is an e-mail address

usabattlebuddies@gmail.com

 

V.

 

Vets Adopt Pets(service dogs)

vetsadoptpets@gmail.com

Vets Adopt Pets

PO Box 15041

SanFrancisco, CA 94115

 

W.

 

WAGS/Vicon Kennels

C/o Connie Standley

36436 Calhoun rd.

Eustis, Florida 32736

phone: 352-482-3988

 

Warrior Dog Foundation

www.warriordogfoundation.org

warriorDog Fund

PO Box 108

Cooper, Texas 75432

phone#

 

Wilderwood Service Dogs

wilderwood@charter.net

www.wilderwood.org

Wilderwood Service Dogs

139 Tuckaleechee Tr.

Maryville,Tennesse 37803

phone#& fax 865-660-0095

Tiffany Denyer,Ex. Director

 

Wisconsin Academy for Graduate Service Dogs,Inc.

info@wags.net

WAGS

c/o Carla Coleman

1338 Dewey Circle

Madison,Wisconsin,53703

phone#608-250-9247

 

Wisconsin Correctional Liberty Dog Program

warden-Dan Bertrand-Daniel Bertrand@doc.state.wi.us

sister Pauline- siaterop@ime.net

Robert Kent -Robert Ken@doc.state.wi.us

Superintendent Bob Kent

Sanger B Powers Correctional

N8375 County Line Rd.Oneida, Wisconsin 54155-9300

Phone# 920-869-1095

 

Wounded Warrior Project

www.woundedwarriorproject.org

4899 Belfort Rd, Suite 300

Jacksonville, Florida 32256

Phone 877-team-WWP(832-6997

904-296-7350

fax-904-296-7347

There are about 15 contact offices in 15 states-

go to www.woundedwarriorproject.com

when in go to contact us: you will see the contacts

 

 

The King of Sadness

“There is so little to remember of anyone – an anecdote, a conversation at a table. But every memory is turned over and over again, every word, however chance, written in the heart in the hope that memory will fulfill itself, and become flesh, and that the wanderers will find a way home, and the peGander Dogrished, whose lack we always feel, will step through the door finally and stroke our hair with dreaming habitual fondness not having meant to keep us waiting long.”

― Marilynne Robinson

 

My wife calls me the King of Sadness. She won’t read anything I write if she is not in a place where she can safely cry. While she sees the need for me to be cathartic and to give others permission to grieve the losses in their life by being honest about my own, she begs me to write more stories of joy and celebration. I think I do. Let me explain….

Today in the lobby of the hotel where we stay while I am receiving care at the VA, a long-term resident overheard me imploring the desk clerk and manager to look out the back door. There, autumn had gently pushed aside summer, the temperature was a perfect 65 degrees and the sun was burning away a sweet fog that had been gently communing with the pond around which Gander walks every morning.

The resident, who for as long as I have known him, has been full of anger and is known for being disgruntled and volatile and feared as mentally unstable. He has more than one sadly descriptive nickname. We parted ways after he once reached down in an attempt to strike Gander when he thought Gander might brush against him. He hates dogs and has fabricated stories to management in an attempt to get them banned from the hotel. If I thought he could be trusted with an animal, I think there is no human more in desperate need of a pet than this man.

Another guest asked our hotel curmudgeon today what everyone was going to look at outside. His reply: “Nothing. Just a little fog on the pond.” His disconnection from the beauty, only a few steps away, refreshed in me an understanding of things I had desperately needed to comprehend.

That “little fog” today, surrendered itself to a beautiful day, and took with it some of the pain and confusion I had been feeling. At the BMW Golf Championships yesterday, Gander and I were both emotionally and physically bruised when a crush of people eager to get an autograph from Tiger Woods pinned us against a retention fence. We were collecting the autographs on a flag to donate to Freedom Service Dogs to auction at their fund raiser this coming weekend. Tiger, afraid of the consequences of staying much longer stopped signing one person short of our position which we had staked out for almost two hours. We left the course almost immediately. On the way home I thought through my day. A few hours earlier, Phil Mickelson’s press agent had responded to my request to take a pic of him and Gander for an upcoming article about the PGA and wounded warriors by saying that Phil felt if he couldn’t take pictures with all vets he would take pictures with no vets. I was licking my pride induced wounds when I heard the news of the shooting in Washington. I quickly wrote a Facebook update: “The more I am around people, the more I love my dog.” My wife reported to me today that I kept her awake as I fought the demons of the day through a fitful night.

There was a book on the market several years ago entitled, The One Minute Meditator. At first glance you might react cynically and believe it to be a cheap pop culture attempt at mindfulness. Not so. In a country where TV news hopes to consume the better parts of our day with polarizing and demoralizing information; where we have lowered our heads six inches, below where it could be in appreciation of the beauty around us, in order to search for “likes” or another SMS; where a Phil Michelson, who makes more in a week than my father, a decorated hero who gave his life for his country made in a lifetime cut short by war, hasn’t time for a picture; where I have seen my government lower the flags to half-mast more in the last 13 years to honor those lost to mass murder than I saw it lowered the whole of the rest of my life in celebration of those who served us, it is important for us to start finding the pleasure in simple acts…

We would do well to drop what we are doing for a moment of silence, or to savor the taste of something delicious in our mouths, or to close our eyes for sixty seconds and let music translate the words our hearts desperately want everyone to understand, to watch a sunrise, or to stroke the fur of an appreciative pet….

How many suicides could be averted? How many could we lift out of depression? How many innocent souls could remain here on earth instead of being violently sent early on their journey to whatever awaits us beyond this life? To how many could we give a moment of pleasure before they are caught up again in the din and roar of a hurried, harried day of trivial pursuits we have come to believe are important?

This year I have watched closely as Gander created thousands of those kinds of meditative minutes. He was a conduit to all that is good in the here and now and to everything in need of remembering. He has provided a spiritual firewire, for me and hundreds of others he has not even met, needed to access the divine. He has facilitated smiles and goodwill in people worldwide. He has started the healing of many a broken spirit. How he has nurtured health in me and others is important: Often it starts with a memory and a moment of shared grief or loss. He reminds us of the dog that made their lives whole and the times and people that surrounded that period; he joins people with memories of a better time by taking them back to that place before somehow guiding them into the present and a celebration of what once was, maybe with the wag of a tail or an understanding kiss on the hand or cheek. Saul Bellow said, “Everybody needs his memories. They keep the wolf of insignificance from the door.” We remember a time when we felt wanted, needed and important.

Grief and the sadness that goes with it are part and parcel of appreciating all that is good. They are travel companions much more comfortable with each other than we know. I have long thought that monsters willing to strike an innocent animal or discharge a lethal bullet in the direction of a stranger must have a monstrous sorrow so tightly constrained that there is little room in their hearts for anything but anger or rage.

I may well be the King of Sadness with Gander as my advisor: Some Merlinesque wizard who can summon the past and cast a spell that empties us of sorrow so we might appreciate, if only for a minute, the joys around us that never really left. I just provide food and shelter for this magical character. He makes us wise by example and allows us to sleep better at night, to be better to all creatures we will meet in our short lives. He helps stretch those meditative minutes into hours, days, weeks…..

I’ll sleep better tonight…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PS:

IN DOGS WE TRUST has an e-book option and it is ready for publication!

There are 25 incredible stories by some of America’s best writers in the print edition.
We have four days left!!!
Please help make it happen. Profits on publication go to Veteran and Service Dog Charities.
http://ow.ly/oXZy2

 

Thank you

20130819-102847.jpg

I get 1-2 requests a day from good people asking for different kinds of financial support, asking questions about how to obtain a service dog, requesting votes for an online contest, or raising support to pay for an assistance dog…

I live on a tight fixed income, but I’ve donated funds many times to help folks who love their dogs enough to have to swallow their pride and ask for outside help when they have no alternative. And I’ve put every one of those requests that seemed authentic on my twitter feed @veterantraveler for 70,000 others to see. I have watched closely and been pleased to see aid come in from friends online for worthy causes.

I’ve connected over a dozen people with advice and referred them on to service dog agencies. Several are waiting now for their companions.

I’ve asked you to support good causes by voting for credible and genuine friends like the Dogington Post as they supported Mill Dog Rescue. I hope we can continue those kinds of efforts.

In the future: I will refrain from soliciting votes for strictly vanity contests. I saw, through the Hero Dog Awards, the anger and discord they bring. I do want to help in events, like those sponsored by American Dog Magazine, where folks without a large support base, like us, can get recognized. And I always want to assist if one of our community members needs support for something worthy.

Gander’s Facebook wall, after the In Dogs We Trust book campaign, will continue to provide smiles and to act as a conduit for acts of kindness. That said, I think our time, money and talent should be respected and never exploited. Social media is in need of new ideas and better that better value us as people and not consumers. Social media needs a conscience check.

I was reluctant to engage friends here in my book campaign. For years I have avoided ads, solicitations and commercialism on all my feeds. I worked hard to build an online community I could learn from, not exploit.

But we have to start somewhere. And once the Indiegogo campaign finishes I hope we will just enough funds from the sale of the books and treats to sustain our charitable agendas: emotionally and physically wounded warriors susceptible to suicide, service dog access and canine rescue efforts.

I’ll be posting an article about our goals and how we plan to meet them next year. It will include visits to towns around America to teach children and small businesses about Service Dogs. And we will be visiting, as always, veteran memorials and resting places where we hope to offer up a twenty-one gun salute to homefront casualties of war: soldiers who have committed suicide. We want shed more light on these men and their stories in hopes of impacting treatment and reducing the shame of asking for help. We will play taps and fire off one shot to represent each one of the 21 vets who took their own lives that day. And we will talk to media and as many people as possible about the healing power of alternative therapies like service and emotional support dogs.

Nothing is ever expected of you here. Nothing. I’m honored to be able to share the adventures of a truly extraordinary dog and the wonderful people he meets. It is a triple pleasure to be part of these stories, share the tales with you and leverage any attention we might get into some measure of social good.

Thank you for all you have done …

IN DOGS WE TRUST: Support Page
http://veterantraveler.com/in-dogs-we-trust-support/

PTSD: Post Traumatic Sarcasm Display

I went through another evaluation this week at the VA. The exams themselves are pretty stressful and could aid or assassinate your disability rating.My diagnosis is older than the cavalry and I figure that telling the truth gives me less to to remember and then stress over….The VA uses a Global Assessment of Functioning Scale (GAF) in part to determine your disability level. The real scale goes like this:

91 – 100
Person has no problems OR has superior functioning in several areas OR is admired and sought after by others due to positive qualities

81 – 90
Person has few or no symptoms. Good functioning in several areas. No more than “everyday” problems or concerns.
71 – 80
Person has symptoms/problems, but they are temporary, expectable reactions to stressors. There is no more than slight impairment in any area of psychological functioning.
61 – 70
Mild symptoms in one area OR difficulty in one of the following: social, occupational, or school functioning. BUT, the person is generally functioning pretty well and has some meaningful interpersonal relationships.
51 – 60
Moderate symptoms OR moderate difficulty in one of the following: social, occupational, or school functioning.
41 – 50
Serious symptoms OR serious impairment in one of the following: social, occupational, or school functioning.
31 – 40
Some impairment in reality testing OR impairment in speech and communication OR serious impairment in several of the following: occupational or school functioning, interpersonal relationships, judgment, thinking, or mood.
21 – 30
Presence of hallucinations or delusions which influence behavior OR serious impairment in ability to communicate with others OR serious impairment in judgment OR inability to function in almost all areas.
11 – 20
There is some danger of harm to self or others OR occasional failure to maintain personal hygiene OR the person is virtually unable to communicate with others due to being incoherent or mute.
1 – 10
Persistent danger of harming self or others OR persistent inability to maintain personal hygiene OR person has made a serious attempt at suicide.

I checked with several vets and found that GAF corresponds loosely to disability rating as follows:

1-20 = 100% or $2,527 a month and free medical care at the VA

30-50 = 50-70% or $356 to $1,161 a month and free medical care at the VA

60 might rate you at 30% if other factors are an issue. That would give you 30% disability and $356 a month and limited care at the VA

So, you can see that the VA leprechauns guard the golden gates of Brigadoon pretty well…

So, time for a little fun…

I stumbled across several spoofs of the GAF as it relates to the VA and I decided to modify one for you. It is not to make light of the disorder, but to spoof a broken system. Like my mom used to say: You have to laugh to keep from crying…

VA GAF

91 – 100 Not much happening and you can tolerate most stress very easily. Your spouse is away for a couple of days and you sneak your dog into the bedroom. One of your kids is wearing his pants below his underwear, but still talks about going to Brown University.

81 – 90 Some minor setbacks. You are late with your AT&T bill but, screw ’em, they have turned into a monopoly again anyway. You have spent $300 more in overages on hold with the VA about your claim. You think Siri is beginning to understand your needs. The dog has wet on the bedroom carpet, but it is dark enough she’ll never notice.

71 -80 AT&T is texting you. You dictate replies to them through Siri. The teachers strike has the kids at home 24/7 and you tell them that if you hear Gotye one more time they will just be somebody that you used to know.

61 – 70 AT&T has discontinued service. Your artillery ears can barely hear the high pitched ringtone on your Cricket phone. The dog has hemorrhoids and drags his butt all the time. The kids duct-taped the neighbor boy to a stolen shopping cart, pushed him into the forest preserve pond and uploaded their Jackass spoof to Youtube. The police are trying to call your old number. You miss Siri: You wanted to ask her why a boxing ring is square.

51 – 60 Your kids have decided to enlist in the military in lieu of jail time. You and the dog howl in harmony. You’d play drinking games if there was any booze left. Cooking distracts you from NCIS and just isn’t worth the effort. The VA has told Homeland Security about your threats.

41 – 50 Your wife has decided to move back in with her dysfunctional family. The VA Homeless program will not accept you as long as you have 3 more months before your bank actually evicts you. You think you can teach the dog to dance and audition for America’s Got Talent. The sun is getting noisier every morning.

31 – 40 The only thing that gets you off the couch is chest pains. You are sure the dog is talking to the cat about you. You asked the cute activist next door to occupy your underpants. The police have your new number.

21 – 30 You siphoned gas from the neighbor’s leaf blower and are going to fix this problem once and for all. The ungrateful dog criticizes you on Twitter and your Klout score hits an all time low.

11 – 20 They move you to a facility where the WWII vets keep trying to get you to surrender. The VA finally approved your claim, but appointed your ex-wife as custodian of your affairs. She promises to give you money for Bingo. You start a blog, because the voices in your head NEED TO BE HEARD. They don’t change your diapers nearly as often as before.

0 – 10 The nurses refuse to take you to the bathroom until you stop yelling, “FIRE IN THE HOLE” and your kids have no more room in their closets for your Afghans sweaters. Your VA claims adjudicator is promoted to regional director for his efficiency. You and reality dissolve your civil union.